8 Comments

  1. Luke Skywalker
    May 29, 2014 @ 6:37 am

    How dare you write such absurdity about my generation. Where did you get your facts? From out of your ass? If there is any generation that is a slacker it is generation Y. Majority of them are in my college courses and have about as much ambition as a dead rat. They want everything handed down to them on a silver platter. Sorry, doesn’t work that way!

    Reply

    • Anne Boysen
      May 29, 2014 @ 11:31 am

      Luke, I hope understand I was being satirical. 🙂

      Reply

      • Bob
        June 3, 2014 @ 10:03 pm

        Actually the first Gen Xers were born in 1965. You’re a year ahead of yourself.

        Reply

        • Anne Boysen
          June 3, 2014 @ 10:15 pm

          Hi Bob,

          Thanks for your comment. I don’t think we can draw a strict line in the sand here. If you go by Strauss & Howe’s classification (which is the most accepted one) Generation X is actually born in 1961. All of these are approximate.

          Reply

          • James Wolfensberger
            June 4, 2014 @ 12:28 am

            I’m fascinated by how the high profile researchers and historians that contribute to the study and observation of generations are very willing to discuss openly the fact that choosing the birth years of a generation can be a gray area for many reasons – but laypersons often become indignant about it and fancy themselves experts by virtue of a Google search.

  2. James Wolfensberger
    May 30, 2014 @ 5:18 am

    I’m an Xer and I study generations informally and my production company is finalizing a documentary on Millennials following nearly 70 interviews. I lived the textbook latchkey Gen X experience. I’ve hired and fired Millennials. This article is actually PACKED with information that can be easily supported. It would take paragraphs to demonstrate how far off base Luke Skywalker actually is… one person’s experience interacting with Millennials is hardly a basis of fact or even trends. Read Time magazine’s major articles on each generation from the 70s, 90s, and today, and they read very similarly at their core: American youth are spoiled in the face of miserable political turmoil and a shaky economy. Again. And news flash – Gen Y didn’t drop from the sky… they were raised by a society of Xers and Boomers.

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  3. LJ
    August 17, 2016 @ 2:36 pm

    Just found this article and comments…and it reminds me of how I used to wonder (20) years ago why 40-year-olds seemed so cranky. I get it now. And the comments back up the hypothesis of my younger days. Gotta say, I got the satire. I thought most of this was funny. Of course, then came truths that hit too close. Like getting the wind knocked out of us by 9/11. I had just started my 30s when all of that happened. Oh well. Anyway, thanks for this article.

    Reply

    • Anne Boysen
      October 13, 2016 @ 2:49 pm

      LJ, thanks for your comment! Yes, there something very finite about growing older. “Older” belongs to the “other” category for so long and then suddenly you find yourself in that same category. And on top of that Gen X just isn’t being heard as well as many other generations. For example, very few people know that Gen X hurt the most financially after the recession.

      Reply

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