• It’s Official, The White House Calls Them “Homeland Generation”

    It’s Official, The White House Calls Them “Homeland Generation”

    The White House recently released a report where they labeled the youngest generation the “Homeland Generation”. A storm of speculations hit the internet soon after. How could the U.S. government choose such a paranoid and xenophobic-sounding epithet? Was this a creepy joke? Some claimed the White House took the name out of thin air. Others(…)

  • My Keynote “From Baby Boomers to Generation Z. Interactivity in Light of Generational Studies”

    My Keynote “From Baby Boomers to Generation Z. Interactivity in Light of Generational Studies”

    I recently did an opening keynote in Bergen, Norway for an organization called Norwegian Audience Development. I will write more about audience development in light of generational change in subsequent posts. In my presentation I discuss the works of historians William Strauss and Neil Howe and try to put their findings into a Scandinavian context.(…)

  • What You Should Know About Marketing To Millennial Parents

    What You Should Know About Marketing To Millennial Parents

    The only other generational topic receiving as much attention as the young Generation Z or Homeland generation is the Millennial parenting cohort raising them. Still held back in life by economic setbacks and lengthy educations, Millennials are nonetheless a family-loving generation and will eventually go for the parenting life phase with full steam. In fact, they like(…)

Raising a Young Generation in the Ongoing Digital Revolution

From Central Texas chapter of World Future Society, May 2014. 45% of our current jobs will disappear by 2035. Middle class jobs are getting fewer as smart machines are replacing jobs and middle class incomes remain stagnant. How can we prepare the next generation to not only coexist, but actually prosper alongside computers in the third industrial revolution or Second Machine Age

Do Generations Matter?

Generational differences are those that evolve as a result of historical changes. Children and teenagers are particularly receptive to changes in their macro-environment and are shaped by these changes. A new generational zeitgeist emerges when younger cohorts interact with changing forces in complex adaptive social systems. Using generational foresight we can identify some of these 'pivot points' and forecast changes even before they happen.

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